Walking The Line

Today I did my monthly travels around town, and as usual, I stopped by the neighborhood 7-Eleven.

No, I didn’t make a mess out of another Slurpee this month as I did last month.  I make mistakes like most human beings do, but I usually do not make the same mistake twice.

I make my Slurpee concoction and head to the check out.  There are two counters at this 7-Eleven, and I’m third in line at the counter farthest from the door.  The blonde haired lady sporting a significant amount of tattoos ahead of me in line is a good six feet behind the first person in the line.  At this store and how tightly packed these stores are spaced, she may as well have been waiting in line in Indian Rocks Beach.

I thought about saying something to this lady, but I ruled against it.  It’s a habit I’m trying to pick up, not letting other people’s arrogance get to me.  Let it go, make note of it, and move on.

Some people aren’t worth your time, or your concern.  That’s what I think.

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OJ Redux?

So Aaron Hernandez of the New England Patriots was arrested yesterday for an alleged murder.  The Pats quickly cut ties to the tight end, releasing him from the ball club.

The evidence against him, from what I have seem, is pretty damning.

But just like every other citizen, the man deserves his day in court.

What happened is nothing new.  How many athletes have we seen over the years get drunk on their own power?  All that “mega money” only seems to lead to bigger troubles for those who can’t get their lives under control.  Mr. Hernandez, like so many before him, fell into that trap.

Another Bout With Mother Nature

You’ll forgive me if I’m a little sick of tornadoes these days.

Friday, we had a microburst where I live in Pinellas Park.

Last night, it was a waterspout-slash-tornado a few miles to my east in the Gandy section of St. Petersburg, not too far from the Derby Lane dog racing track.

The Slow Death Of Television

So like many of you last night, I watched the Skywire show on The Discovery Channel where Nik Wallenda successfully walked across a gorge of the Grand Canyon in Arizona.

But what bothered me about the presentation is that the show began at 8pm our time.  It wasn’t until 9:30 until Wallenda began his death defying act, which went 20-25 minutes before completion.  They hyped the thing for an hour and a half, which I found especially lame considering they had already had two hours of preview shows on before the main show began.

NBC did the same thing with the US Open golf tournament out of the Philadelphia area this year.  Usually when the coverage starts, it’s nothing but golf shots.  This year on both Saturday and Sunday, it was an hour of talk about golf mixed in with the occasional shot, which drives me crazy.

It takes way too long to do so little on TV.  Maybe we have the reality TV genre to thank for that, and their mainly rigged shows.  If you don’t believe me, read the fine print.

Microburst!

Anyone want a branch?
Anyone want a branch?

Maybe it was God’s way of punishing me for my last post.  That thought had not escaped me.

But between 12pm and 1pm yesterday, I got caught in a microburst in my home here in Pinellas Park.  And I was looking right at it when it happened.

I could see it through the screen doors in the back of the house.  It looked like a typical Florida summer thunderstorm one moment, than anything but the next.  The view to the east of my home vanished, and tree branches and other objects went flying all over the place.  My landlord’s cat Harry came running out of the back room into the living room with a yelp.

“Whoa!  Look at that, Harry!” I yelled, more amazed at what was happening than scared.

When the storm died down at about 1pm, I got on my slippers and walked (or sloshed, since there was standing water all over the place) around the house, picking up all the loose branches and lawn furniture that went flying every which way.  The back room of the house had a little bit of standing water too, but that seems to happen once or twice a summer. Routine to pick that up.

Kudos to the city of Pinellas Park and their tree pick-up department, as they got quickly to work collecting the fallen trees and branches.  And there were some that I didn’t catch on my Blackberry camera. I didn’t want to be too much of a looky Lou.

A few miles away, it didn’t even rain at all.  That’s our weather for you.

The Lawn Spy Report

Ameripride Lawn Services doing what they do best: blocking both sides of the road so no one can pass.  May 17, 2013.
Ameripride Lawn Services doing what they do best: blocking both sides of the road so no one can pass. May 17, 2013.

If it’s Friday where I live, it’s the day to cut the lawn.  It’s 9:30 in the morning, and I already hear them at work.

Not that I have a voice in it, but I think my complex gives these people who run our services a little too much power.  In the picture noted above, Ameripride Lawn Service vehicles were blocking BOTH sides of a neighboring street where I live.

Due to the Tropical Storm we received a couple of weeks ago, Ameripride got thrown off their usual schedule of doing our lawns on Friday.  Usually, Saturday is the make up date (yep, if mother nature comes calling we pay the price for it, like we control the weather around here), but for some reason they came the following Wednesday.  Now usually from the first time I hear them until the last time I hear them, the process takes four hours give or take.  That day, for some reason, it took them eight and a half hours.

If that’s all their was to this story, I wouldn’t be posting.

Ameripride blocking a neighboring driveway, June 13, 2013.
Ameripride blocking a neighboring driveway, June 13, 2013.

They come back the next afternoon at 5pm, and totally block the driveway of a neighbor across the way from me.

Ameripride: why do we have to ask your permission to use our roads and our driveways?

I would take this to the management of our complex, but for all I know they could be in collusion with the Ameripride cartel.  So I think I’ll show everyone and let you all draw your own conclusions.